Monday, April 16, 2007

Run your numbers...

Pavel has a line in Power to the People that "...intensity is not a turned around baseball cap (points for the movie reference) - it is a mathmatical formula (% of your 1 rep max - or rep max)". So I decided to sit down and run my numbers:

Bench -
1 rm = 320
70% = 225
75% = 240
80% = 256
85% = 272
90% = 288
95% = 305

Squat-
1 rm = 500
70% = 350
75% = 375
80% = 400
85% = 425
90% = 450
95% = 475

Deadlift-
1 rm = 560
70% = 392
75% = 420
80% = 448
85% = 476
90% = 504
95% = 532

What does all of this mean? That I spend a lot of time at some pretty high percentages. I don't even consider reps below 495 to be worthwhile with my deadlift and I always want to be over 405 in my squat and I work my bench at high %s.

Time to get back to the grand old cycling method and work from low to high on the percentages and high (for me) to low on the volume. This is layed out in very clear detail in Coan's book - classic cycling based on peaking for a meet.

The squat cycle I have planned will take care of the squat and I have a deadlift plan as well and the bench will be restructured to fit.
Stepping back and looking at the numbers instead of perceived exertion is necessary.

3 comments:

Randy said...

Brett,
Planning a cycle after charting your %s is where Prilipin's Rep Chart becomes useful or at least handy:
1RM% / RPS/ OR/ RR
55-65/ 3-6 /24 /18-30
70-75 /3-6 /18 /12-24
80-85/ 2-4 /15 /10-20
90+ /1-2/ 7 /4-10
RPS=Reps per set
OR = Optimum Rep Total per workout
RR = Rep Range per workout
Balancing speed of execution and training load/training effect.

I rarely hit the "optimal" total numbers (supposedly less than optimal reduces training effect)at any of the %s above...5 sets of triples at 80% would wipe me out (too much volume)...but maybe for young guys like you.

RH

Brett Jones said...

Thanks Randy - great info - I am going to hit the Ryabinnikov squat routine starting May 21st - so my thinking will be done for me when I hit that.

Mark Reifkind said...

remember also that lighter weights have their purpose. if they are moved faster you can have as much or more force on the bar than with a heavier weight.

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