Tuesday, April 15, 2008

Article with some great information...

Christian Thibaudeau has a very good new article on T-nation.com....

http://www.t-nation.com/article/most_recent/beast_building_part_1
Christian Thibaudeau has this to say about training the Central Nervous System in his article...

"When I give seminars, one thing that I often say is that the more emphasis you place on the development of the central nervous system (CNS), the more frequently you should train a muscle group. And the more you want to put the emphasis on the development of the muscles, the less often you train each muscle.
The reason for that is simple: Developing the CNS is akin to motor learning, not structural reconstruction. In weight training, developing the CNS could be simplified into "learning to use the muscles you have optimally."
If you want to become a better golfer, you must practice your swing often. If you're allowed to hit 700 golf balls per week, it's much more effective to hit 100 balls everyday than 700 once a week. This is the first rule of motor learning: The frequency of practice is the key to assimilating a skill.
And understand this, activating your muscles, ensuring optimal recruitment patterns, and maximizing inter and intramuscular coordination is a skill, not a physical capacity. To improve it optimally, you thus must treat it like the process of skill acquisition. And that demands a high frequency of practice.


...one of the tenets of motor learning is to perform as many specific and technically correct repetitions of the target movement, without causing a significant fatigue accumulation.
Former Soviet Olympic lifting coaches determined that lifts below 80% of one's maximum have a different recruitment pattern than maximal lifts. This means that to maximize motor learning in the context of strength improvements, lifts
must be at or above 80% of one's best effort in the practiced lift."

Muscles are dumb - They only do what the neurological system tells them to do!

6 comments:

Sean Schniederjan said...

"one thing that I often say is that the more emphasis you place on the development of the central nervous system (CNS), the more frequently you should train a muscle group. And the more you want to put the emphasis on the development of the muscles, the less often you train each muscle."

Brett, I can't wrap my mind around this. Could you give an example of what he's talking about?

Thanks,

Sean

Brett Jones said...

Sean,
Basically - Strength is a skill so if you want to get good at something whether it is squatting or golf you need to practice it frequently.
If you want to "grow" then you need to stimulate the muscles to do so (train) and then give them time to recover.
Hope that clears it up.

Franz Snideman said...

Wow...very insightful stuff from C.T.

Goes back to the SAID principle as well!

thanks for sharing Brett!

Mike T Nelson said...

Perfect practice once again!

Interesting study about 80% as I have seen that before. It is interesting to see how heavy you need to lift in order to get correct transfer to that lift.

For example, we can all probably agree that lifting at 50% of 1 RM on say a deadlift will not improved a 1 RM lift (in trained subjects), but where is the best transfer? 80%, 90% of 1 RM? I would argue that it is probably at min 80% and even 95% at times. The trick is that we can't lift that heavy all the time--hence the art of training. Perhaps heavy isometric holds and partials can help too.

Good stuff
Mike N

Brett Jones said...

Mike,
You certainly have to spend time above 80% to have good transfer and/but things like bands change that a bit - cycling volume and intensity is the key.
Prilipin's chart can provide extra guidance as well.

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